Malware Removal

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Malware Removal 2016-10-26T21:17:21+00:00

MALWARE REMOVAL

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Malware, short for malicious software, is any software used to disrupt computer operations, gather sensitive information, gain access to private computer systems, or display unwanted advertising. Malware is defined by its malicious intent, acting against the requirements of the computer user, and does not include software that causes unintentional harm due to some deficiency. The term badware is sometimes used, and applied to both true (malicious) malware and unintentionally harmful software.

VIRUS

A computer program usually hidden within another seemingly innocuous program that produces copies of itself and inserts them into other programs or files, and that usually performs a malicious action (such as destroying data).

TROJAN HORSE

For a malicious program to accomplish its goals, it must be able to run without being detected, shut down, or deleted. When a malicious program is disguised as something normal or desirable, users may unwittingly install it. This is the technique of the Trojan horse or trojan. In broad terms, a Trojan horse is any program that invites the user to run it, concealing harmful or malicious executable code of any description. The code may take effect immediately and can lead to many undesirable effects, such as encrypting the user’s files or downloading and implementing further malicious functionality.
In the case of some spyware, adware, etc. the supplier may require the user to acknowledge or accept its installation, describing its behavior in loose terms that may easily be misunderstood or ignored, with the intention of deceiving the user into installing it without the supplier technically in breach of the law.

BACKDOOR

A backdoor is a method of bypassing normal authentication procedures, usually over a connection to a network such as the Internet. Once a system has been compromised, one or more backdoors may be installed in order to allow access in the future,invisibly to the user.
The idea has often been suggested that computer manufacturers preinstall backdoors on their systems to provide technical support for customers, but this has never been reliably verified. It was reported in 2014 that US government agencies had been diverting computers purchased by those considered “targets” to secret workshops where software or hardware permitting remote access by the agency was installed, considered to be among the most productive operations to obtain access to networks around the world. Backdoors may be installed by Trojan horses, worms, implants, or other methods.